CS51

Issue 51 Table of Contents

By Cinema Scope / June 28, 2012

This is the complete list of articles from Cinema Scope issue 51. * Articles available online Features *Get Out of the Car: David Cronenberg’s Cosmopolis  by José Teodoro and Adam Nayman *Eight Footnotes On a Brief Description of Footnotes to a House of Love, and Other Films by Laida Lertxundi by Phil Coldiron Holy Terror: Robert…

Read More

Global Discoveries on DVD: Sometimes (Matters Arising)

By Jonathan Rosenbaum / June 24, 2012

By Jonathan Rosenbaum 1. Two special four-disc sets have become available this quarter to fill in sizable gaps in our grasp of Eastern European cinema during the mid-20th century. First, Polish Cinema Classics from Second Run in the UK, gathering together Andrzej Munk’s Eroica (1957), Jerzy Kawalerowicz’s Night Train (1959), Andrzej Wajda’s Innocent Sorcerors (1960),…

Read More

Compliance (Craig Zobel, US)

By Adam Nayman / June 24, 2012

By Adam Nayman In a 2007 interview with Filmmaker magazine, Craig Zobel opined that “there’s something sexy and cool about being a scam artist…it just never fully lets you empathize with the person on the other side of it.” He was referring to the fact that his debut feature Great World of Sound (2007) included…

Read More

Moonrise Kingdom (Wes Anderson, US)

By John Semley / June 24, 2012

By John Semley Kubrick has his monolith, Lynch his voyeur peering through the closet door, Spielberg his countless shots of faces wide-eyed and slack-jawed, awash in the wonder of some off-screen astonishment, all images that singularly apprehend broad authorial sensibilities. It’s been hard to narrow in on any one characteristic image that defines the cinema…

Read More

Film/Art | Beware of the Jollibee: A Correspondence with Lav Diaz

By Andrea Picard / June 24, 2012

By Andréa Picard Twenty years ago, when under the rule of a sole dictator, we knew well whose wrists deserved to feel the sharp ends of our knives. Today, in a society so quick to judge and pass blame, the only flesh that remains to be examined is our own. Diaz’s camera, steadfast, unwavering, reveals…

Read More

CS51 Editor’s Note

By Mark Peranson / June 24, 2012

Editor’s Note Back to business as usual, which means being crabby about Cannes and printing long articles about filmmakers nobody has heard of. We’ll get to Cannes later on, with pieces dispersed throughout Issue 51 and also resting in the typical centre-square spotlight. For now I would rather devote my allotted space to some observations…

Read More

The Cheshire Cat Quinzaine

By Robert Koehler / June 24, 2012

By Robert Koehler It was either a sign of the measure of the complete revulsion felt by those who had worked with previous Quinzaine des Réalisateurs director Frédéric Boyer, or an expression of relief that the 44th edition was coming to a conclusion (or both), that new director Eduoard Waintrop was thanked from the Theatre…

Read More

Post Tenebras Lux (Carlos Reygadas, Mexico)

By Tom Charity / June 24, 2012

By Tom Charity Hand it to Cannes: where else do art films get booed? On the rest of the planet, your typically well-adjusted art-house aficionado understands to appreciate whatever challenges the filmmaker has set…or the viewer walks out. To be sure, there are walkouts here too, but a good many hardier souls take it upon…

Read More

Holy Motors (Leos Carax, France)

By Dennis Lim / June 24, 2012

By Dennis Lim The media gauntlet is so much a part of the Cannes infrastructure that Leos Carax’s decision to withdraw from it was both bold and telling. Despite having one of the most talked-about films at this year’s festival with Holy Motors, Carax granted no interviews, and his public pronouncements were confined to a…

Read More

Cannes 2012: The Forecast Calls for Pain

By Mark Peranson / June 24, 2012

By Mark Peranson This year’s 65th anniversary Festival de Cannes provided the only logical answer to one of the persistent questions in any veteran journalist’s go-to kit: How can Cannes get any worse? Festival-wise, we have a rough idea of what we’re in for under the decade-long reign of Thierry Frémaux: a parade of (mainly)…

Read More

Terror Incognita: Julia Loktev on The Loneliest Planet

By Jay Kuehner / June 24, 2012

By Jay Kuehner Despite the elemental grandeur of its setting and the irony of its title, The Loneliest Planet (2011) hinges neither on the cruelty of nature nor of civilization, but on the betrayals endemic to interpersonal relationships. A deceptively minimal and decidedly haunted pastoral tour that follows a couple of affianced Americans trekking through…

Read More

This Is Not an Omnibus: The Jeonju Digital Project 2012

By Michael Sicinski / June 24, 2012

By Michael Sicinski Twelve years on, the Jeonju International Film Festival’s Digital Project is only getting stronger. This unique endeavour, whose history and raison d’être has been amply chronicled elsewhere (notably by James Bell in Sight & Sound,), remains impossible to pin down. While the JDP has generally remained focused on Asian directors, the project…

Read More

Eight Footnotes on a Brief Description of Footnotes to a House of Love, and Other Films by Laida Lertxundi

By Phil Coldiron / June 24, 2012

By Phil Coldiron …A group of young people1 in the California2 desert.3 A radio.4 A house that’s little more than the idea of a house.5 A woman6 crosses a room, passes by the camera,7 says, “You’re leaving me…”8   1. What does it mean to make youth cinema in America today? While Hollywood aged parabolically…

Read More

Get Out of the Car: David Cronenberg’s Cosmopolis

By Adam Nayman / June 24, 2012

By José Teodoro and Adam Nayman Cosmopolis opens with a hubcap-level pan across a fleet of white stretch limousines, objects of ostentatious wealth, absurdly oversized and ugly, yet invisible in their anonymity and ubiquity, luxurious yet barely able to move through a teeming city’s daily traffic. A great deal of David Cronenberg’s film, which spans…

Read More

Exploded View | Serene Velocity / World on a Wire

By Chuck Stephens / June 24, 2012

By Chuck Stephens Start with the title, as you would a William Carlos Williams poem: Serene Velocity (1970)—tranquil and accelerating, blissful and fleet. Ladies and gentlemen, we are floating, faster and faster, in space. Now look at the screen. SUNY-Binghamton grads will recognize the place: filmmaker Ernie Gehr taught there at the end of the…

Read More

Amour (Michael Haneke, France/Austria)

By Christoph Huber / June 20, 2012

By Christoph Huber Besting Bille August by a year, it has taken Austrian director Michael Haneke only four to join what we cynical film critics like to call the Emir club: the allegedly prestigious circle of two-time Palme d’Or winners, hitherto occupied only by Kusturica (1985, 1995), August (1988, 1992), and the Dardennes (1999, 2005).…

Read More