For advertising information, call Jennifer Scott at 416 985 4341 or email info@cinema-scope.com or use the contact form below.

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From the Magazine

  • Cinema Scope 80 Table of Contents

    Interviews  No God But the Unknown Pietro Marcello and Maurizio Braucci on Martin Eden by Jordan Cronk I See a Darkness: Pedro Costa on Vitalina More →

  • No God But the Unknown: Pietro Marcello and Maurizio Braucci on Martin Eden

    By Jordan Cronk “Of course it was beautiful; but there was something more than beauty in it, something more stingingly splendid which had made beauty More →

  • I See a Darkness: Pedro Costa on Vitalina Varela

    A moving study of mourning and memory, Pedro Costa’s revelatory new film offers an indelible portrait of Vitalina Taveres Varela, a fragile yet indomitable woman who makes the long voyage from Cape Verde to Lisbon to attend her estranged husband’s funeral, but misses the event itself because of cruel bureaucratic delays. More →

  • Woman on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown: Kazik Radwanski’s Anne at 13,000 ft

    The prospect of spending an hour and a half with people lacking in notable virtue, alluring vice, or any apparent interest, may seem like an unproductive exercise in forced empathy—but consider this skepticism a function, as opposed to a fault, of these tightly orchestrated, seemingly soporific character studies. More →

  • For a Cinema of Bombardment

    Although there have always been intrepid critics and cinephiles who have engaged with films belonging to the non-narrative avant-garde, there has existed a perception that such films, operating as they do on somewhat different aesthetic precepts, could be considered a separate cinematic realm, one that even the most dutiful critic could engage with or not, as he or she saw fit. More →