This the full table of contents from Cinema Scope Magazine #65. We post selected articles from each issue on the site which you can read for free using the links below. This is only possible with support from our subscribers, so please consider a subscription to the magazine, or  the instant digital download version. 


Interviews

Two Years at Sea: An Interview With Mauro Herce
By Jay Kuehner

Punch-Drunk Love: Josh Mond’s James White
By Adam Nayman (Subscribe)

Body Politic: Gabriel Mascaro on Neon Bull
By José Teodoro

Features

hurt-steve-fonyo-tiff15

Failure Hasn’t Spoiled Him Yet: Alan Zweig Succeeds in Spite of Himself
By Jason Anderson

Live in Black and White: Stan Douglas’ Helen Lawrence
By Michael Vass (Subscribe)

Landscape Suicide: The Films of Daïchi Saïto
By Jordan Cronk

Želimir Žilnik: Not Reconciled
By Celluloid Liberation Front (Subscribe)

Mother of All of Us: Ida Lupino, The Filmaker
By Christoph Huber

Columns

Editor’s Note

Deaths of Cinema: La Ressasseuse: Chantal Akerman, 1950–2015
By Kate Rennebohm

Global Discoveries on DVD
By Jonathan Rosenbaum

Film/Art: Ali Cherri
By Andréa Picard (Subscribe)

Exploded View: Peter Mays’ Death of the Gorilla
By Chuck Stephens

Spotlight: Fall Festival Highlights

chevalier

Chevalier by Samuel La France

Trois souvenirs de ma jeunesse by Max Nelson (Subscribe)

Blood of My Blood by Blake Williams

Homeland (Year Zero) by Steve Macfarlane (Subscribe)

The Waiting Room / How Heavy This Hammer by Sean Rogers (Subscribe)

Kaili Blues by Shelly Kraicer

Office by Daniel Kasman (Subscribe)

Happy Hour by Michael Sicinski

Currency

Carol by Phil Coldiron

Anomalisa by Richard Porton (Subscribe)

Bridge of Spies by Adam Nayman (Subscribe)

The Visit by Adam Cook (Subscribe)

Room by Angelo Muredda

Web Only

from afar

From Afar by Quintín

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From the Magazine

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    The Cinema Scope Top Ten of 2020 Interviews The Girl and the Spider *En plein air: Denis Côté on Hygiène sociale by Jordan Cronk *The More →

  • The Cinema Scope Top Ten of 2020

    1. Days (Tsai Ming-liang) 2. The Works and Days (of Tayoko Shiojiri in the Shiotani Basin) (C.W. Winter and Anders Edström) 3. The Year of More →

  • TV or Not TV | The Politics of Dancing: Adam Curtis’ Can’t Get You Out of My Head

    With the arrival of any new Adam Curtis film comes a deluge of coverage, commentaries, analysis, harangues, point-counterpoints, fact checks, further-reading lists, and good old-fashioned snark spread across an ever-expanding plethora of platforms. The resulting cacophony makes one of the fundamental appeals of Curtis’ practice—his seeming ability to wrest a temporary sense of order and coherence from a dense matrix of ideas, factoids, fragments, and audiovisual ephemera from deep within the BBC archive that otherwise threatens to feel as disordered and disorienting as everyday life—seem all the more valuable. More →

  • DVD | Reclaiming the Dream: Joyce Chopra’s Smooth Talk

    Her reflection comes as a revelation. In the safety of her bedroom, Connie (Laura Dern), the 15-year-old protagonist of Joyce Chopra’s 1985 feature debut Smooth Talk (recently released on a Criterion Blu-ray), adjusts her new halter top in the mirror, its strings crisscrossed down the middle of her chest to hang limp over her exposed midriff. The camera observes her in profile as she spins and arches her back, her gaze glued to the supple body in the reflection, luxuriating in her new possession. More →

  • Gag Orders: The Trial of the Chicago 7 and Judas and the Black Messiah

    Bobby Seale makes a cameo of sorts midway through Judas and the Black Messiah, as Martin Sheen’s porcine J. Edgar Hoover—checking in personally on the progress of the FBI’s campaign against Chicago Black Panther Party chairman Fred Hampton (Daniel Kaluuya)—is shown an artist’s sketch of the BPP’s national chairman gagged and shackled in the courtroom during the Chicago Conspiracy Trial. This revolting spectacle understandably serves as the mid-film dramatic highpoint of The Trial of the Chicago 7, when the repeated, suitably indignant demands by Seale (Yahya Abdul-Mateen II) to serve as his own defense counsel in the absence of his hospitalized lawyer—and presiding judge Julius Hoffman’s (Frank Langella) incredible refusal to grant this right, instead directing that Seale’s defense should be undertaken by the representatives for the other defendants—ultimately lead to him being bodily removed from the courtroom by marshals and returned in chains. That image of a defiant Black man, forcibly silenced and immobilized in a hall of American justice, became one of William Burroughs’ “frozen moment[s] at the end of the newspaper fork,” when everyone—including those who would applaud it—can see what they’re being fed. More →