This the full table of contents from Cinema Scope Magazine #65. We post selected articles from each issue on the site which you can read for free using the links below. This is only possible with support from our subscribers, so please consider a subscription to the magazine, or  the instant digital download version. 


Interviews

Two Years at Sea: An Interview With Mauro Herce
By Jay Kuehner

Punch-Drunk Love: Josh Mond’s James White
By Adam Nayman (Subscribe)

Body Politic: Gabriel Mascaro on Neon Bull
By José Teodoro

Features

hurt-steve-fonyo-tiff15

Failure Hasn’t Spoiled Him Yet: Alan Zweig Succeeds in Spite of Himself
By Jason Anderson

Live in Black and White: Stan Douglas’ Helen Lawrence
By Michael Vass (Subscribe)

Landscape Suicide: The Films of Daïchi Saïto
By Jordan Cronk

Želimir Žilnik: Not Reconciled
By Celluloid Liberation Front (Subscribe)

Mother of All of Us: Ida Lupino, The Filmaker
By Christoph Huber

Columns

Editor’s Note

Deaths of Cinema: La Ressasseuse: Chantal Akerman, 1950–2015
By Kate Rennebohm

Global Discoveries on DVD
By Jonathan Rosenbaum

Film/Art: Ali Cherri
By Andréa Picard (Subscribe)

Exploded View: Peter Mays’ Death of the Gorilla
By Chuck Stephens

Spotlight: Fall Festival Highlights

chevalier

Chevalier by Samuel La France

Trois souvenirs de ma jeunesse by Max Nelson (Subscribe)

Blood of My Blood by Blake Williams

Homeland (Year Zero) by Steve Macfarlane (Subscribe)

The Waiting Room / How Heavy This Hammer by Sean Rogers (Subscribe)

Kaili Blues by Shelly Kraicer

Office by Daniel Kasman (Subscribe)

Happy Hour by Michael Sicinski

Currency

Carol by Phil Coldiron

Anomalisa by Richard Porton (Subscribe)

Bridge of Spies by Adam Nayman (Subscribe)

The Visit by Adam Cook (Subscribe)

Room by Angelo Muredda

Web Only

from afar

From Afar by Quintín

Follow

Friend me on FacebookFollow me on TwitterRSS Feed

From the Magazine

  • Cinema Scope 80 Table of Contents

    Interviews  No God But the Unknown Pietro Marcello and Maurizio Braucci on Martin Eden by Jordan Cronk I See a Darkness: Pedro Costa on Vitalina More →

  • No God But the Unknown: Pietro Marcello and Maurizio Braucci on Martin Eden

    By Jordan Cronk “Of course it was beautiful; but there was something more than beauty in it, something more stingingly splendid which had made beauty More →

  • I See a Darkness: Pedro Costa on Vitalina Varela

    A moving study of mourning and memory, Pedro Costa’s revelatory new film offers an indelible portrait of Vitalina Taveres Varela, a fragile yet indomitable woman who makes the long voyage from Cape Verde to Lisbon to attend her estranged husband’s funeral, but misses the event itself because of cruel bureaucratic delays. More →

  • Woman on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown: Kazik Radwanski’s Anne at 13,000 ft

    The prospect of spending an hour and a half with people lacking in notable virtue, alluring vice, or any apparent interest, may seem like an unproductive exercise in forced empathy—but consider this skepticism a function, as opposed to a fault, of these tightly orchestrated, seemingly soporific character studies. More →

  • For a Cinema of Bombardment

    Although there have always been intrepid critics and cinephiles who have engaged with films belonging to the non-narrative avant-garde, there has existed a perception that such films, operating as they do on somewhat different aesthetic precepts, could be considered a separate cinematic realm, one that even the most dutiful critic could engage with or not, as he or she saw fit. More →