INTERVIEWS AND FEATURES

The Land of the Unknown: Roberto Minervini on What You Gonna Do When the World’s on Fire? by Jordan Cronk

“Poetry floats up in my memory like sailboats in the fog”: Alexei German’s Khrustalyov, My Car! by Daniel Witkin

With Forever Presence: Jonathan Schwartz (1973-2018) by Max Goldberg

Soft and Hard: Claire Denis on High Life by Adam Nayman

Encore: Dora García’s Segunda vez by Michael Sicinski

Learning to Live Together: Three Films by Beatrice Gibson by Phil Coldiron

Woman with a Whip: The Transgressive Westerns of Barbara Stanwyck by Alicia Fletcher

Ghost Operas: Music from the Films of Bertrand Bonello by Sean Rogers

SPOTLIGHT: FALL FESTIVAL HIGHLIGHTS

Belmonte by Darren Hughes

Edge of the Knife by Jesse Cumming

I Remember the Crows by James Lattimer

A Land Imagined by Lawrence Garcia

Manta Ray by Jennifer Lynde Barker

Nervous Translation by Erika Balsom

Our Time by Blake Williams

Rojo by Jay Kuehner

COLUMNS

Editor’s Note

Deaths of Cinema: Burt Reynolds by Christoph Huber

Film/Art: Richard Billingham’s RAY & LIZ and Yervant Gianikian & Angela Ricci Lucchi’s I diari di Angela—Noi due cineasti by Andréa Picard

Canadiana: Highlights from the Year in Canadian Shorts by Josh Cabrita

TV or Not TV: A Tale of Two Handmaids by Jerry White

Global Discoveries on DVD by Jonathan Rosenbaum

Exploded View: Ken Jacobs’ Nervous Magic Lantern by Chuck Stephens

WEB ONLY

Festivals: Doclisboa 2018 by Christopher Small

Festivals: RIDM 2019 by Justine Smith

CURRENCY

Roma by Robert Koehler

A Star Is Born by Mallory Andrews

The Favourite by Courtney Duckworth

Green Book by Angelo Muredda

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