Interviews and Features

*Audrey II: Sofia Bohdanowicz and Deragh Campbell’s MS Slavic 7; By Adam Nayman

*The Exorcist: Barbara Loden and Wanda. By Courtney Duckworth. 

Presence and Poetry: Margaret Tait at 100. By Cayley James.

*To Thine Own Self Be True: Angela Schanelec on I Was at Home, But… By Giovanni Marchini Camia. 

Cruel Stories of Youth: Obayashi Nobuhiko’s Hanagatami. By Lawrence Garcia.

*You Can’t Own an Idea: The Films of James N. Kienitz Wilkins. By Dan Sullivan.

Art Like Bread: The Films of Patrick Wang. By Michael Sicinski.

*Screenlife’s What You Make It: Thoughts on Searching, Profile, Unfriended: Dark Web, and Cam. By Jason Anderson.

Between Light and Nowhere: On the Video Art of Rainer Kohlberger. By Blake Williams.

Columns

*Editor’s Note

*Film/Art – Andy Warhol’s Empire, By Phil Coldiron

Deaths of Cinema – Ringo Lam. By Christoph Huber.

*Deaths of Cinema – Jocelyne Saab. By Celluloid Liberation Front

*Festivals

Sundance. By Robert Koehler.

Berlin. By Jordan Cronk.

Self-determined. Perspectives on Women Filmmakers. By Clara Miranda Scherffig.

Rotterdam: Zhu Shengze’s Present.Perfect. By Jesse Cumming.

DVD Bonus

Pioneers: First Women Filmmakers. By Alicia Fletcher

*Global Discoveries on DVD. By Jonathan Rosenbaum. 

*Exploded View – Makino Takashi’s Ghost of OT301. By Chuck Stephens. 

Currency

*Répertoire des villes disparues. By Josh Cabrita.

Anthropocene: The Human Epoch. By Angelo Muredda.

Happy New Year, Colin Burstead. By Adam Cook.

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