Interviews

*The New Workout Plan: Denis Côté’s Ta peau si lisse  by Adam Nayman

Denis Côté’s Ta peau si lisse by Adam Nayman

*Inner and Outer Space: Wang Bing Talks About Mrs. Fang by Daniel Kasman and Christopher Small

*The Land of Terrible Legends: Narimane Mari on Le fort des fous by Jordan Cronk

Add It Up: Valérie Massadian on Milla by Andréa Picard

The Movie Orgy: Sammy Harkham on Blood of the Virgin by Sean Rogers

Features

*Ahead of Its Reflection: Ben Russell’s Good Luck by Phil Coldiron

All Tomorrow’s Féeries: An Introduction to Pierre Léon by Boris Nelepo

*Those You Call Mutants: The Films of Lucrecia Martel by Blake Williams

*Ephraim Asili’s Immeasurable Equations by Jesse Cumming

Our Hitlers: Hans-Jürgen Syberberg and the Roots of the Alt-Right by Jerry White

Columns

*Editor’s Note*Editor’s Note

Deaths of CinemaA Brief History of the Mad PeopleGeorge A. Romero, 1940-2017 by Christoph Huber

*Film/ArtMeet the Restacks: Dani Leventhal and Sheilah Wilson on Strangely Ordinary

This Devotion by Michael Sicinski

TV or Not TVA Little Night Music – Twin Peaks: The Return, Part 8 by Kate Rennebohm

Books: Laurel Fantauzzo’s The First Impulse by Tony Rayns

*DVD Bonus: Capital, CityThree Films by Lino Brocka by Lawrence Garcia

*Global Discoveries on DVD by Jonathan Rosenbaum

Canadiana: Once You’re Here, It’s Hard to LeaveThe New Nova Scotia Cinema by Josh Cabrita

*Exploded View: Bill Viola’s I Do Not Know What It Is I Am Like by Chuck Stephens

Currency

*Did You Wonder Who Fired the Gun? by Celluloid Liberation Front

The Beguiled by Chelsea Phillips-Carr

*Ex Libris—The New York Public Library by Tom Charity

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From the Magazine

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