Interviews and Features

Electroshock Therapy: Matthew Rankin on The Tesla World Light by Jason Anderson

Quiet Savagery: A Tale of Two Tourneurs by Christoph Huber

All You Can Eat: The Heroism of Howard Hughes by Adam Nayman

Censoring Shakespeare: Ing K’s Shakespeare Must Die by Nathan Letoré

Would You Like to See a Magic Trick?: Basma Alsharif’s Ouroboros and its Contexts by Phil Coldiron

A Passage Through: Filipa César’s Spell Reel  by Jesse Cumming

Dusting the Corners: Luke Fowler’s Restorative Histories by Michael Sicinski

Rossellini’s War Trilogy: Neorealism or Historical Revisionism? by Celluloid Liberation Front

Spotlight: Cannes 2017

Cannes at 70: Bad Times, Good Time by Mark Peranson

Web Extra: An Element of Danger: Josh and Benny Safdie on Good Time by Dan Sullivan

The Square by Josh Cabrita

The Day After / Claire’s Camera  by Andréa Picard

At the Frontier: Valeska Grisebach on Western by James Lattimer

Closeness by Daniel Kasman

24 Frames by Blake Williams

Deserting the Real: Documentaries at Cannes by Richard Porton

Jeannette, l’enfance de Jeanne d’Arc by Jordan Cronk

Un beau soleil intérieur by Giovanni Marchini Camia

Columns

Editor’s Note

Festivals

The Nitrate Picture Show by Alicia Fletcher and Samuel La France

TV or Not TV

Twin Peaks: The Return by Kate Rennebohm

Global Discoveries on DVD by Jonathan Rosenbaum

DVD Bonus: Fat City and Hard Times by Sean Rogers

Exploded View: Peter Gidal’s Room (Double Take) by Chuck Stephens

Currency

Baby Driver by Robert Koehler

Araby by Jay Kuehner

Maison du bonheur by Angelo Muredda

Risk by Steve Macfarlane

Web Extra: Sandy Wexler by Adam Nayman

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From the Magazine

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