This the full table of contents from Cinema Scope Magazine #70. We post selected articles from each issue on the site which you can read for free using the links below. This is only possible with support from our subscribers, so please consider a subscription to the magazine, or  the instant digital download version. 


Interviews

The Quest for Beauty: James Gray and The Lost City of Z by Daniel Kasman

*Cinema Concrete: Dane Komljen’s All the Cities of the North by Robert Koehler

*First Do No Harm: Hugh Gibson on The Stairs by Angelo Muredda

A Workingman’s Life: Michael Glawogger, Monika Willi, and Untitled by Andréa Picard

Features

*Orchestrating the Apocalypse: The Survival Horror of Paul W.S. Anderson’s Resident Evils by Christoph Huber

*Small Things and Big Things:Feng Xiaogang’s I Am Not Madame Bovary by Shelly Kraicer

The Land of Sound, the Land of Images: On Recent Works by Sky Hopinka by Jesse Cumming

*Common Boston: Dennis Lehane on Screen by Sean Rogers

*Unseen Forces:Joshua Bonnetta in Sound and Image by Michael Sicinski

Agitate Everywhere: On Sergei Eisenstein’s Drawings by Phil Coldiron

Columns

*Editor’s Note

*Film/Art: Indeed, We Know: On the Video Art of Elizabeth Price by Blake Williams

Festivals

Sundance (I) by Alicia Fletcher

*Sundance (II) by Jay Kuehner

*Berlin by Jordan Cronk

*Deaths of Cinema: Nothing Will Die: John Hurt, 1940–2017 by Adam Nayman

Nirvanna the Band the Show by Jason Anderson

*Global Discoveries on DVD by Jonathan Rosenbaum

*Exploded View: Will Hindle by Chuck Stephens

Currency

*Silence by Andrew Tracy

Get Out by Adam Nayman

Maliglutit (Searchers) by Samuel La France

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From the Magazine

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