This the full table of contents from Cinema Scope Magazine #70. We post selected articles from each issue on the site which you can read for free using the links below. This is only possible with support from our subscribers, so please consider a subscription to the magazine, or  the instant digital download version. 


Interviews

The Quest for Beauty: James Gray and The Lost City of Z by Daniel Kasman

*Cinema Concrete: Dane Komljen’s All the Cities of the North by Robert Koehler

*First Do No Harm: Hugh Gibson on The Stairs by Angelo Muredda

A Workingman’s Life: Michael Glawogger, Monika Willi, and Untitled by Andréa Picard

Features

*Orchestrating the Apocalypse: The Survival Horror of Paul W.S. Anderson’s Resident Evils by Christoph Huber

*Small Things and Big Things:Feng Xiaogang’s I Am Not Madame Bovary by Shelly Kraicer

The Land of Sound, the Land of Images: On Recent Works by Sky Hopinka by Jesse Cumming

*Common Boston: Dennis Lehane on Screen by Sean Rogers

*Unseen Forces:Joshua Bonnetta in Sound and Image by Michael Sicinski

Agitate Everywhere: On Sergei Eisenstein’s Drawings by Phil Coldiron

Columns

*Editor’s Note

*Film/Art: Indeed, We Know: On the Video Art of Elizabeth Price by Blake Williams

Festivals

Sundance (I) by Alicia Fletcher

*Sundance (II) by Jay Kuehner

*Berlin by Jordan Cronk

*Deaths of Cinema: Nothing Will Die: John Hurt, 1940–2017 by Adam Nayman

Nirvanna the Band the Show by Jason Anderson

*Global Discoveries on DVD by Jonathan Rosenbaum

*Exploded View: Will Hindle by Chuck Stephens

Currency

*Silence by Andrew Tracy

Get Out by Adam Nayman

Maliglutit (Searchers) by Samuel La France

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From the Magazine

  • Issue 84 Table of Contents

    INTERVIEWS *The Act of Living: GianfrancThe Act of Living: Gianfranco Rosi on Notturnoo Rosi on Notturno By Mark Peranson*Reconstructing Violence: Nicolás Pereda on Fauna By More →

  • The Act of Living: Gianfranco Rosi on Notturno

    “The night scares me so much,” confesses a courageous Yazidi pre-teen girl to a therapist, remembering the period when she and her younger sister were captured by ISIS. Anyone who was seen crying would be killed, they were told; it turned out to be a vacant threat, but the sisters were still beaten, and now they are attempting to exorcise their memories by drawing pictures of them. Does it help? We never find out. More →

  • Reconstructing Violence: Nicolás Pereda on Fauna

    There’s a point in nearly every Nicolás Pereda film when the narrative is either reoriented or upended in some way. In the past this has occurred through bifurcations in story structure or via ruptures along a given film’s docufiction fault line. Pereda’s ninth feature, Fauna, extends this tradition, though its means of execution and conceptual ramifications represent something new for the 38-year-old Mexican-Canadian filmmaker. More →

  • I Lost It at the Movies: Charlie Kaufman’s Antkind and I’m Thinking of Ending Things

    “It’s all planned, but it isn’t thought out,” wrote Pauline Kael in her review of A Woman Under the Influence (1974), a nifty bit of critical jiu-jitsu turning John Cassavetes’ much-theorized—and, during Kael’s reign at The New Yorker, much-derided—technique of spontaneous improvisation within a dramatic framework against him. More →

  • Open Ticket: The Long, Strange Trip of Ulrike Ottinger

    One of the most surprising things about Ulrike Ottinger’s new documentary Paris Calligrammes is how accessible it is. Some cinephiles may be familiar with Ottinger based on an 11-year period of mostly fictional productions that were adjacent to the New German Cinema but, for various reasons, were never entirely subsumed within that rubric. Others are quite possibly more aware of her later work in documentary, in particular her commitment to a radical form of experimental ethnographic cinema. More →